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ISRN Neurology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 701950, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/701950
Review Article

Innate Immune Regulation by Toll-Like Receptors in the Brain

Institute for Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 432, 40530 Gothenburg, Sweden

Received 24 July 2012; Accepted 4 September 2012

Academic Editors: A. Martinuzzi and B. Moreno-López

Copyright © 2012 Carina Mallard. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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