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ISRN Immunology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 795075, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/795075
Review Article

Role of Natural Killer Cells in Multiple Sclerosis

Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, POB 1103, 0317 Oslo, Norway

Received 26 July 2012; Accepted 29 August 2012

Academic Editors: M. C. Béné and A. Tommasini

Copyright © 2012 A. A. Maghazachi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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