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ISRN Neurology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 850150, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/850150
Research Article

Survival of Dopaminergic Amacrine Cells after Near-Infrared Light Treatment in MPTP-Treated Mice

1Discipline of Anatomy & Histology F13, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
2Discipline of Physiology F13, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
3Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London, London EC1VGEL, UK
4Department of Optometry and Visual Science, City University, London EC1V7DD, UK

Received 3 February 2012; Accepted 1 April 2012

Academic Editors: G. Meco, J.-I. Satoh, K. F. So, and F. G. Wouterlood

Copyright © 2012 Cassandra Peoples et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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