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ISRN Allergy
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 102418, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/102418
Review Article

The Challenge of Delivering Therapeutic Aerosols to Asthma Patients

Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Careggi University Hospital, Largo Brambilla 3, 50134, Florence, Italy

Received 16 May 2013; Accepted 23 June 2013

Academic Editors: G. Nicolini and F. Ram

Copyright © 2013 Federico Lavorini. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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