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ISRN Emergency Medicine
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 583132, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/583132
Review Article

Management of Pain in the Emergency Department

Kaiser Foundation, University of Oklahoma, Department of Emergency Medicine, 4501 East, 41st Street, Suite 2E14, Tulsa, OK 74135, USA

Received 3 April 2013; Accepted 23 April 2013

Academic Editors: O. Karcioglu, L. M. Lewis, and R. Pitetti

Copyright © 2013 Stephen H. Thomas. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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