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ISRN Physiology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 806104, 23 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/806104
Review Article

Brain Physiology and Pathophysiology in Mental Stress

Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204, USA

Received 23 April 2013; Accepted 15 May 2013

Academic Editors: J. Cannon, Y. Ootsuka, and K. Sakuma

Copyright © 2013 Karim Alkadhi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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