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Journal of Allergy
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 510380, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/510380
Research Article

The Relationship between Mold Exposure and Allergic Response in Post-Katrina New Orleans

1Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, 1440 Canal Street SL-18, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
2Allergy and Immunology, Ochsner Health System, 1514 Jefferson Highway, Jefferson, LA 70121, USA
3Department of Biostatistics, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, 1440 Canal Street, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
4Faculty of Biological Science, The University of Tulsa, 600 S. College, Tulsa, OK 74104, USA

Received 12 November 2009; Revised 30 March 2010; Accepted 3 April 2010

Academic Editor: Ting Fan Leung

Copyright © 2010 Felicia A. Rabito et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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