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Journal of Allergy
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 236075, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/236075
Review Article

The Contribution of Allergen-Specific IgG to the Development of Th2-Mediated Airway Inflammation

1Committee on Molecular Pathology and Molecular Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
2Interdisciplinary Scientist Training Program and Committee on Immunology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
3Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA

Received 11 June 2012; Accepted 18 September 2012

Academic Editor: Hamida Hammad

Copyright © 2012 Jesse W. Williams et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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