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Journal of Allergy
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 790910, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/790910
Clinical Study

Induction of Specific Immunotherapy with Hymenoptera Venoms Using Ultrarush Regimen in Children: Safety and Tolerance

1Christine Kühne-Center for Allergy Research and Education, University Children's Hospital Zurich, Steinwiesstraße 75, 8032 Zurich, Switzerland
2Children's Allergy and Asthma Hospital, Hochgebirgsklinik Davos, 7265 Davos, Switzerland

Received 14 April 2011; Accepted 16 June 2011

Academic Editor: Mary Beth Hogan

Copyright © 2012 Alice Köhli-Wiesner et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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