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Journal of Amino Acids
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 352538, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/352538
Review Article

The Catalytic Machinery of a Key Enzyme in Amino Acid Biosynthesis

1Department of Chemistry, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606, USA
2Structural Biology Lab, Cold Spring Harbor Labs, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, USA
3Rocky Mountain Labs, National Institutes of Health, Hamilton, MT 59840, USA
4Department of Pharmacology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA

Received 2 October 2010; Accepted 7 November 2010

Academic Editor: Shandar Ahmad

Copyright © 2011 Ronald E. Viola et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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