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Journal of Amino Acids
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 461216, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/461216
Review Article

Protein Modification by Dicarbonyl Molecular Species in Neurodegenerative Diseases

1Department of Biological Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
2Department of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA

Received 3 November 2010; Accepted 10 January 2011

Academic Editor: Jackob Moskovitz

Copyright © 2011 Wesley M. Williams et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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