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Journal of Amino Acids
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 843206, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/843206
Review Article

Functional Subunits of Eukaryotic Chaperonin CCT/TRiC in Protein Folding

1Molecular Genetics Laboratory, School of Biotechnology, National Institute of Technology Calicut, Kerala 673601, India
2Department of Biosciences, Jamia Millia Islamia, Jamia Nagar, New Delhi 110025, India
3Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Rochester Medical Center, NY 14642, USA
4Department of Biology, Alabama A&M University, Normal, AL 35762, USA

Received 15 February 2011; Accepted 5 April 2011

Academic Editor: Shandar Ahmad

Copyright © 2011 M. Anaul Kabir et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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