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Journal of Amino Acids
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 382107, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/382107
Review Article

Neurofilament Phosphorylation during Development and Disease: Which Came First, the Phosphorylation or the Accumulation?

1Division of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211, USA
2Bond Life Sciences Center, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211, USA

Received 17 November 2011; Accepted 31 January 2012

Academic Editor: Ewa A. Bienkiewicz

Copyright © 2012 Jeffrey M. Dale and Michael L. Garcia. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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