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Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 280727, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/280727
Research Article

Comparing the Support-Efficacy Model among Centenarians Living in Private Homes, Assisted Living Facilities, and Nursing Homes

1Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, Bradley University, Peoria, IL 61625, USA
2Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA
3School of Family Studies and Human Services, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA
4Human Development and Family Science Department, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, USA
5Institute of Gerontology, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA

Received 10 February 2011; Accepted 26 April 2011

Academic Editor: Bo A. Hagberg

Copyright © 2011 G. Kevin Randall et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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