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Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 532079, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/532079
Research Article

Falling Less in Kansas: Development of a Fall Risk Reduction Toolkit

1Regional Institute on Aging, Wichita State University, 1845 Fairmount Street, Wichita, KS 67260, USA
2Department of Physical Therapy, Wichita State University, 1845 Fairmount Street, Wichita, KS 67260, USA
3Elliott School of Communication, Wichita State University, 1845 Fairmount Street, Wichita, KS 67260, USA
4Envision Vision Rehabilitation Center, 610 N. Main Street, Wichita, KS 67203, USA
5Department of Physician Assistant, Wichita State University, 1845 Fairmount Street, Wichita, KS 67260, USA
6Harvey County Department on Aging, 800 N. Main Street, Newton, KS 67114, USA
7Center for Physical Activity and Aging, Wichita State University, 1845 Fairmount Street, Wichita, KS 67260, USA
8Aging Studies, Department of Public Health Sciences, Wichita State University, 1845 Fairmount Street, Wichita, KS 67260, USA

Received 1 June 2011; Accepted 11 July 2011

Academic Editor: Wojtek Chodzko-Zajko

Copyright © 2011 Teresa S. Radebaugh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Falls are a serious health risk for older adults. But for those living in rural and frontier areas of the USA, the risks are higher because of limited access to health care providers and resources. This study employed a community-based participatory research approach to develop a fall prevention toolkit to be used by residents of rural and frontier areas without the assistance of health care providers. Qualitative data were gathered from both key informant interviews and focus groups with a broad range of participants. Data analysis revealed that to be effective and accepted, the toolkit should be not only evidence based but also practical, low-cost, self-explanatory, and usable without the assistance of a health care provider. Materials must be engaging, visually interesting, empowering, sensitive to reading level, and appropriate for low-vision users. These findings should be useful to other researchers developing education and awareness materials for older adults in rural areas.