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Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 814096, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/814096
Review Article

Pathways to Aging: The Mitochondrion at the Intersection of Biological and Psychosocial Sciences

Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, McGill University, 475 Pine Avenue, Montreal, QC, Canada H2W 1S4

Received 16 February 2011; Revised 11 May 2011; Accepted 11 July 2011

Academic Editor: Leonard W. Poon

Copyright © 2011 Martin Picard. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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