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Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 896109, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/896109
Research Article

Do Stress Trajectories Predict Mortality in Older Men? Longitudinal Findings from the VA Normative Aging Study

1Human Development & Family Sciences, School of Social & Behavioral Health Sciences, College of Public Health & Human Sciences, Oregon State University, Milam Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
2Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Imperial College School of Medicine, Norfolk Place, London W2 1PG, UK
3Normative Aging Study, VA Boston Healthcare System (151MAV), 150 South Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02130, USA
4Departments of Epidemiology and Psychiatry, Boston University Schools of Public Health and Medicine, 715 Albany Street T 3E, Boston, MA 02118, USA

Received 16 March 2011; Accepted 8 June 2011

Academic Editor: Leonard W. Poon

Copyright © 2011 Carolyn M. Aldwin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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