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Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 912680, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/912680
Research Article

Successful Aging and Longevity in Older Old Women: The Role of Depression and Cognition

1Department of Psychology and Institute of Gerontology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202-3801, USA
2Veterans Health Administration, HSR&D/RR&D Center of Excellence, Tampa, FL 33637-1022, USA

Received 15 March 2011; Revised 2 May 2011; Accepted 17 May 2011

Academic Editor: B. A. Hagberg

Copyright © 2011 Daniel Paulson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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