Table 1: Profile of study participants ( 𝑛 = 3 0 ).

La Petite-PatrieLower NDGTotal

Total participants181230
Men6511
Women12719

65–69101
70–74134
75–798311
80–84415
85–90336
90+123

Mother tongue
French12012
English055
Italian6713

Highest level of education*
Primary school (incomplete or complete)8715
Some high school516
High school (completed)213
Postsecondary224

Socioeconomic status
Low income#9312

Current residents
Owners5914
Renters13316
Renters living in HLM (public housing)415

Former residents516
Years in neighbourhood £
Less than 30 years549
30 to 39 years729
50 years and over6612
Total181230

*No information for two participants, one in each neighbourhood.
#For the study purposes, low-income participants are those receiving the guaranteed income supplement (GIS), which provides additional money to top off the Old Age Security Pension. The maximum annual income for a single person GIS recipient is $15,960 (Service Canada, Old Age Security Payment Rates, April-June 2011: http://www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/isp/oas/oasrates.shtml). This definition is more stringent than Statistics Canada’s low-income cut-off of $22,229 before tax in 2009 for a single person living in a city of more than 100,000 inhabitants (Statistics Canada, Low Income Lines 2008-2009: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75f0002m/2010005/tbl/tbl02-eng.htm).
HLM (Habitations à loyer modique) are apartment complexes for low-to-modest income households, owned and managed by the public sector. Rent is set at 25% of household income and includes basic utilities. Tenants are selected from a waiting list according to needs-based criteria established by the provincial government. Those in our study are specifically for autonomous older adults.
£Lowest value of years in neighbourhood is 9 years followed by 12 years; all others resided in neighbourhood over 15 years.