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Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 267327, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/267327
Research Article

Rumination and Age: Some Things Get Better

1Research Unit INSIDE, University of Luxembourg, Campus Walferdange, Route de Diekirch, 7220 Walferdange, Luxembourg
2Research Group on Health Psychology, University of Leuven, Tiensestraat 102, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
3Department of Research Methodology, Measurement and Data Analysis, Faculty of Behavioral Sciences, University of Twente, Drienerlolaan 5, 7522 NB Enschede, The Netherlands
4Department of Psychology I, University of Würzburg, Marcusstraße 9-11, 97070 Würzburg, Germany

Received 5 September 2011; Revised 28 November 2011; Accepted 13 December 2011

Academic Editor: Thomas M. Hess

Copyright © 2012 Stefan Sütterlin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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