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Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 273185, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/273185
Research Article

Swimming as a Positive Moderator of Cognitive Aging: A Cross-Sectional Study with a Multitask Approach

UMR CNRS 7295, University of Poitiers, Sport Sciences Faculty, Bât. A5, 5 rue Théodore Lefebvre, 86000 Poitiers, France

Received 6 August 2012; Revised 31 October 2012; Accepted 14 November 2012

Academic Editor: Teresa Liu-Ambrose

Copyright © 2012 Amira Abou-Dest et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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