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Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 287438, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/287438
Research Article

Social Activity and Cognitive Functioning Over Time: A Coordinated Analysis of Four Longitudinal Studies

1Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3050 STN CSC, Victoria, BC, Canada V8W 3P5
2Harborview Medical Center and General Internal Medicine, University of Washington, Box 359780, 325 Ninth Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104, USA
3Department of Psychology, California State University, Los Angeles, 5151 State University Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90032, USA
4Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science and Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, P.O. Box 100, SE 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden
5Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, P.O. Box 500, SE 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden
6Bedford Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 200 Springs Rd, Bedford, MA 01730, USA
7Department of Psychology and Neurology, University of South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Avenue, Tampa, FL 33620, USA
8Center for Biomedical Imaging, Medical University of South Carolina, 68 President St, MSC 120, Charleston, SC 29425, USA
9Andrus Gerontology Center and Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0191, USA
10Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, 180 Nickerson, Suite 206, Seattle, WA 98109, USA
11Department of Psychology, University of Alberta, P-217 Biological Sciences Building, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2E9
12Davis Lawrence J. Ellison Ambulatory Care Center, University of California, 4860 Y Street, Ste 0100, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA

Received 30 March 2012; Accepted 30 July 2012

Academic Editor: Denis Gerstorf

Copyright © 2012 Cassandra L. Brown et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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