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Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 768304, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/768304
Review Article

Molecular Mechanisms for Age-Associated Mitochondrial Deficiency in Skeletal Muscle

1Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan
2Research Center for Physical Fitness, Sports and Health, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tenpaku-cho, Toyohashi 441-8580, Japan

Received 7 December 2011; Accepted 23 January 2012

Academic Editor: Jan Vijg

Copyright © 2012 Akira Wagatsuma and Kunihiro Sakuma. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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