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Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 356948, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/356948
Research Article

Falls Risk and Simulated Driving Performance in Older Adults

1Department of Psychology and Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
2Department of Psychology, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816, USA

Received 8 November 2012; Accepted 19 January 2013

Academic Editor: Karl Rosengren

Copyright © 2013 John G. Gaspar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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