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Journal of Botany
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 862516, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/862516
Review Article

Genome Size Dynamics and Evolution in Monocots

1Jodrell Laboratory, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 3AD, UK
2Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511, USA
3School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, E1 4NS, UK

Received 7 January 2010; Accepted 8 March 2010

Academic Editor: Johann Greilhuber

Copyright © 2010 Ilia J. Leitch et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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