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Journal of Biomarkers
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 538765, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/538765
Review Article

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Metabolomics: Clinical Implication and Therapeutic Approach

1Center for Shock, Trauma and Anesthesiology Research (STAR) and the Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
2Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 733 N. Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
3Department of Biochemistry, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Avadh University, Faizabad 224001, India

Received 28 August 2012; Accepted 2 February 2013

Academic Editor: Maria Dusinska

Copyright © 2013 Alok Kumar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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