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Journal of Cancer Epidemiology
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 242151, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/242151
Research Article

Chromosome 5p Region SNPs Are Associated with Risk of NSCLC among Women

1Cancer Biology Program, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, 4100 John R, Detroit, MI 48201, USA
2Population Studies and Prevention Program, Karmanos Cancer Institute, 4100 John R, Detroit, MI 48201, USA
3Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, 4100 John R, Detroit, MI 48201, USA
4Biostatistics Core, Karmanos Cancer Institute, 716 Harper Professional Building, 4160 John R, Detroit, MI 48201, USA
5Applied Genomics Technology Center and Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Wayne State University School of Medicine & Genomics Core, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Mott Center, 275 E Hancock, Detroit, MI 48201, USA

Received 1 September 2009; Accepted 14 December 2009

Academic Editor: Carmen J. Marsit

Copyright © 2009 Alison L. Van Dyke et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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