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Journal of Cancer Epidemiology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 294730, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/294730
Research Article

Patterns of Cancer Genetic Testing: A Randomized Survey of Oregon Clinicians

1Oregon Genetics Program, Public Health Division, Oregon Health Authority, Portland, OR 97232, USA
2Oregon Center for Children and Youth with Special Health Needs, Child Development and Rehabilitation Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239, USA
3Survey Research Lab, Office of Research and Sponsored Projects, Portland State University, Portland, OR 97201, USA
4Center for Public Health Practice, Public Health Division, Oregon Health Authority, Portland, OR 97232, USA

Received 16 March 2012; Revised 11 June 2012; Accepted 12 June 2012

Academic Editor: Suzanne C. O'Neill

Copyright © 2012 Summer L. Cox et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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