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Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 203141, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/203141
Research Article

Built Environment and Its Influences on Walking among Older Women: Use of Standardized Geographic Units to Define Urban Forms

1Population Research Center and Institute of Metropolitan Studies, Portland State University, P.O. Box 751, Portland, OR 97207, USA
2Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Mail Code CB 669, Portland, OR 97239, USA
3Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research, Northwest/Hawaii, 3800 N. Interstate Avenue, Portland, OR 97227, USA
4Metro Data Resource Center, 600 NE Grand Avenue, Portland, OR 97232, USA
5Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Drexel University School of Public Health, 1505 Race Street, MS 1033, Philadelphia, PA 19102, USA

Received 4 January 2012; Accepted 12 June 2012

Academic Editor: David Strogatz

Copyright © 2012 Vivian W. Siu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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