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Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 356798, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/356798
Review Article

Environmental Determinants of Chronic Disease and Medical Approaches: Recognition, Avoidance, Supportive Therapy, and Detoxification

1Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, and Senior Clinical Research Associate, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L1
2RR 1, Box 9012, Dunrobin, ON, Canada K0A 1T0
3Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6K 4C1

Received 16 July 2011; Accepted 19 October 2011

Academic Editor: Janette Hope

Copyright © 2012 Margaret E. Sears and Stephen J. Genuis. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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