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Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 460508, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/460508
Review Article

Mercury Toxicity and Treatment: A Review of the Literature

1Bernhoft Center for Advanced Medicine, Suite 208, 11677 San Vicente Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90049, USA
2Los Angeles Center for Advanced Medicine, Brentwood Gardens Suite 208, 11677 San Vicente Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90049, USA

Received 4 July 2011; Accepted 1 November 2011

Academic Editor: Margaret E. Sears

Copyright © 2012 Robin A. Bernhoft. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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