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Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 958175, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/958175
Review Article

Health and the Built Environment: Exploring Foundations for a New Interdisciplinary Profession

City Futures Research Centre, Faculty of the Built Environment, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia

Received 6 January 2012; Revised 18 April 2012; Accepted 9 May 2012

Academic Editor: David Strogatz

Copyright © 2012 Jennifer Kent and Susan Thompson. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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