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Journal of Geological Research
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 759395, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/759395
Research Article

Multiscale Erosion Surfaces of the Organic-Rich Barnett Shale, Fort Worth Basin, USA

Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez University, Salah Naesem St., Etaka, Suez 43721, Egypt

Received 21 September 2012; Revised 18 March 2013; Accepted 10 April 2013

Academic Editor: Steven L. Forman

Copyright © 2013 Mohamed O. Abouelresh. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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