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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2008 (2008), Article ID 723539, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/723539
Review Article

Antigen-Induced Immunomodulation in the Pathogenesis of Atherosclerosis

1Faculty of Heath and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK
2Department of Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-6904, USA
3Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 -1678, USA

Received 17 December 2007; Revised 2 April 2008; Accepted 30 April 2008

Academic Editor: Shyam Mohapatra

Copyright © 2008 Natalia Milioti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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