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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 139127, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/139127
Review Article

The Tuberculous Granuloma: An Unsuccessful Host Defence Mechanism Providing a Safety Shelter for the Bacteria?

INSERM U892, CNRS UMR 6299, Université de Nantes, 44007 Nantes Cedex 1, France

Received 9 December 2011; Revised 16 April 2012; Accepted 30 April 2012

Academic Editor: E. Shevach

Copyright © 2012 Mayra Silva Miranda et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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