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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 438078, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/438078
Review Article

The Need for Inducing Tolerance in Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation

1Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center (DUMC) 3512, Durham, NC 27710, USA
2Institute for Cellular Therapeutics and Jewish Hospital, University of Louisville, 570 South Preston Street, Suite 404, Louisville, KY 40202-1760, USA

Received 5 July 2012; Accepted 14 September 2012

Academic Editor: Gerald Brandacher

Copyright © 2012 Kadiyala V. Ravindra et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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