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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 534291, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/534291
Review Article

Complement Activation and Inhibition in Wound Healing

1Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333 ZA Leiden, The Netherlands
2Department of Surgery, Bronovo Hospital, 2597 AX The Hague, The Netherlands
3Department of Trauma Surgery, University Hospital Zurich, Rämistrasse 100, 8006 Zürich, Switzerland
4Department of Infectious Diseases, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333 ZA Leiden, The Netherlands

Received 7 August 2012; Revised 5 December 2012; Accepted 7 December 2012

Academic Editor: Daniel Rittirsch

Copyright © 2012 Gwendolyn Cazander et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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