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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 760965, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/760965
Review Article

Immunotherapy of Cancer: Reprogramming Tumor-Immune Crosstalk

1Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Massey Cancer Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
2Department of Internal Medicine, Massey Cancer Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
3Department of Human and Molecular Genetics, Massey Cancer Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA

Received 2 August 2012; Accepted 25 September 2012

Academic Editor: Guido Kroemer

Copyright © 2012 Kyle K. Payne et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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