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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 820827, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/820827
Research Article

Fibronectin Binding Is Required for Acquisition of Mesenchymal/Endothelial Differentiation Potential in Human Circulating Monocytes

1Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan
2Innovative Drug Research Laboratories, Research Division, Kyowa Hakko Kirin Co., Ltd., 3 Miyahara, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1295, Japan
3Department of Biology, School of Education, Waseda University, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480, Japan

Received 4 July 2012; Accepted 24 September 2012

Academic Editor: Jacek Tabarkiewicz

Copyright © 2012 Noriyuki Seta et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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