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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 863264, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/863264
Review Article

Tolerance Induction Strategies in Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation: Mixed Chimerism and Novel Developments

1Transplantation Biology Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02129, USA
2Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Research, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK
3Biology Department, Emmanuel College, Boston, MA, USA

Received 1 July 2012; Revised 6 November 2012; Accepted 3 December 2012

Academic Editor: Gerald Brandacher

Copyright © 2012 David A. Leonard et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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