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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 125643, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/125643
Research Article

Dextromethorphan Inhibits Activations and Functions in Dendritic Cells

1Institute of Biomedical Science, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan
2Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan
3Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan
4Laboratory of Toxicology and Pharmacology, National Institutes of Environmental, Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA
5Graduate Institute of Immunology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan
6Biomedical Technology and Device Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan
7Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan
8Division of Chest Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua 500, Taiwan
9Department of Respiratory Care, College of Health Sciences, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan 711, Taiwan
10School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan
11Department of Medical Research and Education, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan

Received 1 February 2013; Accepted 25 March 2013

Academic Editor: Beatrice Gaugler

Copyright © 2013 Der-Yuan Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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