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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 217934, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/217934
Review Article

Homeostatic T Cell Proliferation after Islet Transplantation

San Raffaele Diabetes Research Institute, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan, Italy

Received 4 June 2013; Accepted 1 July 2013

Academic Editor: Camillo Ricordi

Copyright © 2013 Paolo Monti and Lorenzo Piemonti. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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