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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 240570, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/240570
Review Article

Collagen XVII: A Shared Antigen in Neurodermatological Interactions?

Vanha Vaasa Hospital, 65380 Vaasa, Finland

Received 17 April 2013; Accepted 19 June 2013

Academic Editor: Carlos Barcia

Copyright © 2013 Allan Seppänen. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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