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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 373579, 27 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/373579
Review Article

Human Polyomavirus Reactivation: Disease Pathogenesis and Treatment Approaches

1Department of Virology, Frimley Park Hospital, Frimley, Surrey GU16 7UJ, UK
2National Virus Reference Laboratory, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland

Received 4 February 2013; Revised 27 March 2013; Accepted 27 March 2013

Academic Editor: Mario Clerici

Copyright © 2013 Cillian F. De Gascun and Michael J. Carr. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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