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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 413465, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/413465
Review Article

Initial Immunopathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis: Innate Immune Response

1Neuroimmunology and Neuro-Oncology Unit, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (INNN), Insurgentes Sur 3877, 14269 Mexico City, DF, Mexico
2Neurochemistry Unit, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (INNN), Insurgentes Sur 3877, 14269 Mexico City, DF, Mexico

Received 9 May 2013; Revised 1 July 2013; Accepted 9 August 2013

Academic Editor: Daniel Larocque

Copyright © 2013 Norma Y. Hernández-Pedro et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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