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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 429373, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/429373
Review Article

Osteoclasts and CD8 T Cells Form a Negative Feedback Loop That Contributes to Homeostasis of Both the Skeletal and Immune Systems

Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, 1100 S. Grand Boulevond DRC 605, St. Louis, MO 63104, USA

Received 1 March 2013; Accepted 22 May 2013

Academic Editor: Roberta Faccio

Copyright © 2013 Zachary S. Buchwald and Rajeev Aurora. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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