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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 948976, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/948976
Review Article

The Benefits and Detriments of Macrophages/Microglia in Models of Multiple Sclerosis

1Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 4N1
2The Departments of Clinical Neurosciences and Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 4N1

Received 26 March 2013; Accepted 16 May 2013

Academic Editor: Wolfgang J. Streit

Copyright © 2013 Khalil S. Rawji and V. Wee Yong. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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