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Journal of Lipids
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 565316, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/565316
Review Article

Apoptotic Sphingolipid Ceramide in Cancer Therapy

1Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan
2Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan
3Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan

Received 24 August 2010; Accepted 26 October 2010

Academic Editor: Xian-Cheng Jiang

Copyright © 2011 Wei-Ching Huang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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