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Journal of Nanomaterials
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 341015, 23 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/341015
Review Article

Function of Nanocatalyst in Chemistry of Organic Compounds Revolution: An Overview

1Organic Chemistry Division, School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu 632 014, India
2Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Engineering Building I, Raleigh, NC 27695-7907, USA
3Chemistry Research Laboratory, Organic Chemistry Division, School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu 632 014, India

Received 2 April 2013; Accepted 21 April 2013

Academic Editor: Minghang Li

Copyright © 2013 Kanagarajan Hemalatha et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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