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Journal of Nanomaterials
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 629681, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/629681
Review Article

Nanomedicine in Action: An Overview of Cancer Nanomedicine on the Market and in Clinical Trials

Nordion Inc., 447 March Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada K2K 1X8

Received 22 October 2012; Accepted 9 November 2012

Academic Editor: Haiyan Li

Copyright © 2013 Ruibing Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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